Cayman Islands: Trademarks Comparative Guide

Last Updated: 16 October 2019
Article by Sophie Peat
Do you want to compare other jurisdictions?... Click here

1 Legal framework

1.1 What is the statutory or other source of trademark rights?

The Trade Marks Law, 2016 (Law 31 of 2016), to be read in conjunction with the Trade Marks Regulations, 2017 and the Trade Marks (Transitional Provisions) Regulations, 2017.

1.2 How do trademark rights arise (ie, through use or registration)?

Trademark protection is acquired by registration. However, unregistered rights can be acquired through use if goodwill protectable under the common law of passing off is created.

1.3 What is the statutory or other source of the trademark registration scheme?

The Trade Marks Law, the Trade Marks Regulations and the Trade Marks (Transitional Provisions) Regulations.

2 What constitutes a trademark?

2.1 What types of designations or other identifiers may serve as trademarks under the law?

Any sign that is capable of being represented graphically and of distinguishing the goods or services of one undertaking from those of others may serve as a trademark under the Trade Marks Law. Such signs may consist of words (including personal names), designs, numerals, letters or the shape of goods or their packaging. Sound, smell and colour marks are not expressly excluded. However, it may be difficult for such marks to satisfy the graphical representation requirement.

2.2 What are the requirements for a designation or other identifier to function as a trademark?

A designation or other identifier must be capable of distinguishing the goods or services of one undertaking from those of others in order to function as a trademark.

2.3 What types of designations or other identifiers are ineligible to function as trademarks?

The following shall not be registered as trademarks under the Trade Marks Law:

  • signs which are not capable of graphical representation and are not capable of distinguishing the goods or services of one undertaking from those of others;
  • trademarks which are devoid of any distinctive character;
  • trademarks which consist exclusively of signs or indications which may serve in trade to designate the kind, quality, quantity, intended purpose, value, geographical origin, time of production of goods or provision of services, or other characteristics of goods or services;
  • trademarks which consist exclusively of signs or indications which have become customary in the current language or in bona fide and established practices of the trade;
  • signs which consist exclusively of a shape which results from the nature of the goods themselves;
  • signs which consist exclusively of a shape of goods which is necessary to obtain a technical result;
  • signs which consist exclusively of a shape which gives substantial value to the goods;
  • signs which are contrary to public policy or to accepted principles of morality;
  • trademarks which may deceive the public as to the nature, quality or geographical origin of the goods or services, or any other feature of the goods or services;
  • trademarks which contain any word, letter or device specified by the registrar as a restricted or prohibited word, letter or device;
  • trademarks whose use is prohibited in the Cayman Islands by any law;
  • trademarks which are filed in bad faith; and
  • trademarks which consist of or contain national flags, insignia of royalty, insignia of international organisations and national emblems or the design of such flags without consent.

3 Registration procedure

3.1 Which governing body (ie, trademark office) controls the registration process?

The Cayman Islands Intellectual Property Office (CIIPO), being a division of the Cayman Islands Government's General Registry Department (www.ciipo.ky).

3.2 What fees does the trademark office charge for an application, during prosecution and for issuance of a registration?

CIIPO charges CI$200 to process an application through to registration in one class and CI$75for each additional class. A publication fee of CI$50 is also applicable per mark.

3.3 Does the trademark office use the Nice Classification scheme?

The Nice Classification system is used in the Cayman Islands.

3.4 Are ‘class-wide' applications allowed, or must the applicant identify the specific goods or services for which the mark will be used?

General indications found in the class headings between semicolons will be accepted as sufficiently clear and precise. Where class headings are used, it will be assumed that the scope of cover is not intended to cover all goods in the class, but rather the ordinary meaning of the words. The applicant can choose to list specific goods or services in addition to the class heading. The following general indications of class headings will not be accepted, as they are considered to lack clarity and precision to specify the scope of protection for which the trademark is sought:

  • Class 7 – Machines and machine tools;
  • Class 37 – Repair;
  • Class 37 – Installation services;
  • Class 40 – Treatment of materials; and
  • Class 45 – Personal and social services rendered by others to meet the needs of individuals.

The expression ‘all goods' or ‘all services' is considered too broad and too vague and will not be accepted.

3.5 Must an applicant have a bona fide intention to use the trademark for the goods or services identified in the application in order to apply for registration?

There is no requirement for an applicant to have a bona fide intention to use the trademark for the goods or services identified in the application in order to apply for registration.

3.6 Does the trademark office perform relative examination of trademark applications (ie, searches for earlier conflicting marks)?

The registrar will not refuse an application on relative grounds unless an earlier rights holder files a successful opposition against the application. The registrar will, however, conduct a search of earlier trademarks on the register to such extent as the registrar considers necessary. The purpose of the search is to ascertain whether there are on record, in respect of the same goods or services or description of goods or services, any marks that are identical to the mark applied for, or that so nearly resemble it as to render the mark applied for likely to deceive or cause confusion. Where this appears to be the case, the examiner shall notify this fact to the applicant's registered agent and the registered agent of the proprietor of the earlier right.

3.7 What types of examinations does the trademark office perform other than relative examination?

The examiner endeavours to complete a preliminary examination of the trademark application within 14 days of receipt of the application and then issues a filing date. The purpose of the preliminary examination is to check that the application form has been completed correctly. Substantive examination is generally conducted within 30 to 60 days of completion of the preliminary examination, and the focus is on examination on absolute grounds. The registrar will check that the trademark application does not fall within one of the exclusions to registration as set out in question 2.3.

3.8 Apart from confusion with a senior mark, descriptiveness and genericness, are there other grounds under which a mark is ineligible for registration, such as public policy reasons?

The full list of grounds on under which a mark is ineligible for registration – including public policy reasons – is set out in question 2.3. As explained in question 3.6, the examiner will not refuse an application on the basis of confusion with a senior mark.

3.9 Is there a separate or supplemental register on which descriptive marks may be registered?

There is no separate or supplemental register on which descriptive marks may be registered.

3.10 Can a third party object to registration of a mark before the application has been published (eg, by letter of protest to the trademark office)?

There is no provision for the submission of such a letter in the Trade Marks Law. However, where an application has been published, any person, at any time before registration of the trademark, may make observations in writing to the registrar as to whether the trademark should be registered and the registrar shall inform the applicant of those observations.

3.11 Must the applicant use the trademark commercially in order to obtain a registration?

There is no requirement for the applicant to use the trademark commercially in order to obtain a registration.

3.12 How much time does it typically take from filing an application to the first office action?

Substantive examination is generally conducted within 30 to 60 days of completion of the preliminary examination. If acceptable, the application will then be published in the IP Gazette for opposition purposes for a period of 60 days (the opposition period cannot be extended). If there are objections, an office action should be issued shortly after completion of the substantive examination.

3.13 How much time does it typically take from filing an application to publication?

Normally, 60 to 90 days.

4 Appeals

4.1 If the trademark office refuses registration, can the applicant appeal? If so, to what body and by what procedure?

Any person aggrieved by a decision of the registrar (including any act of the registrar in exercise of a discretion vested in the registrar by the Trade Marks Law) may appeal to the Appeals Tribunal.

4.2 What is the procedure for appealing a trademark office refusal?

Notice of appeal must be made on Form TM21 and shall include the appellant's grounds of appeal and the case in support of the appeal. The appeal must be filed with the chairman of the Appeals Tribunal and a copy filed with the registrar within 14 days of the date of notification of the registrar's decision.

4.3 Can the reviewing body's decision be appealed? If so, to what body and by what procedure?

A further appeal may be made to the Grand Court from a decision of the Appeals Tribunal on a point of law only.

5 Oppositions

5.1 Can a third party oppose a trademark application?

Third parties can oppose trademark applications.

5.2 Who has standing to oppose a trademark application?

Any person has standing to oppose a trademark application.

5.3 What is the timeframe for opposing a trademark application?

The opposition period is open for a period of 60 days from the date of publication in the IP Gazette. A notice of opposition (Form TM4) and statement of grounds must be filed. The opposition deadline cannot be extended.

5.4 Which body hears oppositions?

The registrar shall hear the opposition proceedings.

5.5 What is the process by which an opposition proceeds?

Within 60 days of the date on which the registrar sends the notice of opposition and statement of grounds to the applicant, the applicant must send to the registrar a counterstatement (Form TM5). Where the applicant fails to file a counterstatement within the time allowed, the application –insofar as it relates to the goods and services in respect of which the opposition proceeding is directed – shall be deemed to be withdrawn, unless the registrar directs otherwise.

Where the applicant files a counterstatement, the registrar shall immediately send a copy of the same to the opponent. Within 90 days of the date on which the registrar sends the copy of the counterstatement to the opponent, the opponent shall submit to the registrar evidence by way of witness statement and any accompanying exhibits as the opponent may desire to adduce in support of the opposition proceedings, and shall deliver to the applicant a copy of such evidence. The applicant will also have the opportunity to file evidence in response.

Upon completion of the evidence rounds, the registrar shall give notice to the parties of a date on which the arguments in the case will be heard. Within seven days of the date on which the registrar sends such notice, both parties must notify the registrar as to whether they wish to be heard (Form H1) or whether, instead, they wish for a determination from the papers to be made. If neither party wishes to be heard, the registrar shall notify the parties and make a determination from the papers.

5.6 Can the decision on the opposition be appealed? If so, to what body and by what procedure?

Appeals are made to the Appeals Tribunal, established for the purpose of hearing appeals from persons aggrieved by decisions of the registrar. The procedure is outlined in the question 4.2.

6 Rights of registered and unregistered marks

6.1 What, if any, protection is afforded to unregistered trademarks?

Unregistered rights in a mark can be acquired through use if goodwill protectable under the common law of passing off is created. The owner of the goodwill must be able to demonstrate a misrepresentation leading to damage in order to succeed in a case of passing off. The evidential burden is high.

6.2 What legal rights are conferred by a trademark registration?

The owner of a trademark has the exclusive right to use, license and sell the registration for the duration of the trademark registration.

6.3 If there is a separate register for descriptive marks, what legal rights are conferred by registration therein?

No.

7 Enforcement and remedies for trademark infringement

7.1 What remedies are available against trademark infringement?

Relief includes:

  • injunctions;
  • award of damages or account of profits; and
  • delivery up and/or destruction of infringing materials.

Criminal remedies are also available and concern unauthorised use of a trademark in relation to goods, falsification of the register and false representation of a trademark as registered.

7.2 What remedies are available against trademark dilution?

Relief includes:

  • injunctions;
  • award of damages or account of profits; and
  • delivery up and/or destruction of infringing materials.

7.3 Does the law recognise remedies against other harms to trademark rights besides infringement and dilution?

The Trade Marks Law also considers use of a trademark that takes or would take unfair advantage of, or be detrimental to, the distinctive character or the repute of that trademark as infringement. Furthermore, the law provides that a trademark shall not be registered if, or to the extent that, its use in the Cayman Islands is liable to be prevented by virtue of the law of passing off or any law that protects an unregistered trademark or other sign used in the course of trade.

7.4 What is the procedure for pursuing claims for trademark infringement?

A claim must be filed at the Grand Court.

7.5 What typical defences are available to a defendant in trademark litigation?

A registered trademark is not infringed by:

  • the use by a person of that person's own name or address;
  • the use of indications concerning the kind, quality, intended purpose, value, geographical origin or production of goods or rendering of services; or
  • the use of a trademark where it is necessary to indicate the intended purpose of a product or service (in particular, as accessories or spare parts), as long as the use is in accordance with honest practices in industrial or commercial matters.

A registered trademark is also not infringed by use in relation to goods which have been put on the market under that trademark by the owner or with the owner's consent. However, this rule does not apply where legitimate reason exists for the owner to oppose further dealings in the goods – in particular, where the condition of the goods has been changed or been impaired after they have been put on the market.

A registered trademark is also not infringed by use by a person in the course of trade in the Cayman Islands of an unregistered trademark or other sign in relation to goods or services, if the unregistered trademark or other sign has been so used in the Cayman Islands by that person or a predecessor in title continuously from a date preceding the earlier of:

  • the date of first use in the Cayman Islands of the trademark which is registered; or
  • the date of registration in the Cayman Islands of that trademark.

7.6 What is the procedure for appealing a decision in trademark litigation?

Permission of the Grand Court is required in order to appeal to the Court of Appeal. Permission will be granted only where the Grand Court concludes that the appeal would have a real prospect of success or there is some other compelling reason for the appeal to be permitted. The Court of Appeal will generally allow an appeal where the decision of the lower court was wrong due to an error of law or to a more limited extent, a question of fact, or due to wrongful exercise of discretion.

8 Maintenance and removal of registrations

8.1 What is the length of the initial term of registration and what is the length of renewal terms?

The initial term of registration is 10 years from the date of filing, renewable every 10 years thereafter.

8.2 What, if anything, must be submitted to the trademark office to maintain or renew a registration?

An application must be filed on Form TM6, accompanied by the renewal fee. In addition to the renewal fee, which is due every 10 years, annual fees must be paid every 1 January in order to keep a trademark registration in good standing.

8.3 What are the grounds for cancelling a trademark registration?

A third party may apply to cancel a trademark registration on grounds of invalidity and/or revocation. The registration of a trademark may be revoked if:

  • the use made of the trademark by the owner or by another person with the owner's consent, in relation to the goods or services for which it is registered, is liable to mislead the public, particularly as to the nature, quality or geographical origin of those goods or services; or
  • as a consequence of the action or inaction of the owner, the trademark has become the common name in the respective trade for a product or service for which it is registered.

A trademark may be invalidated if it can be shown that it should never have been registered on absolute or relative grounds.

8.4 Under what circumstances may the trademark office cancel a registration on its own initiative?

The registrar may, subject to the provisions of the Trade Marks Law, remove from the register any matter which appears to the registrar to have ceased to have effect and have the fact of its removal published by way of notice in the IP Gazette.

8.5 What is the procedure by which a third party may seek cancellation of a trademark registration?

An application for revocation or invalidity may be made to the registrar or the court. If filed with the registrar, Form TM15 (revocation) or TM14 (invalidity) should be used. The grounds for revocation/invalidity should be stated on the form. The registered owner will then have the opportunity to file arguments and evidence. The applicant will also have the opportunity to file agreements and evidence in reply. At the conclusion of the evidence rounds, either a hearing will be set or a decision on the papers will be handed down.

8.6 What is the procedure for appealing a decision cancelling a registration?

Appeals are made to the Appeals Tribunal, established for the purpose of hearing appeals from persons aggrieved by decisions of the registrar. A further appeal may be made to the Grand Court from a decision of the Appeals Tribunal on a point of law only.

9 Licensing

9.1 Are there particular requirements, such as quality control by the licensor, for a trademark licence to be valid?

There is no quality control requirement, although it would be prudent to include this in the licence agreement. A licence is not effective unless it is in writing signed by or on behalf of the grantor. Unless the licence provides otherwise, the licence is binding on a successor in title to the grantor's interest.

9.2 Must trademark licences be recorded with the trademark office or other governing body?

Form TM11 is used to record a licence. A copy of the licence need not be filed if the application is validated by the agent of the licensor or the licensor. All transactions with the Cayman Islands Intellectual Property Office must be made by a registered agent. Until an application has been made for registration, the prescribed particulars of a licence are ineffective as against a person acquiring a conflicting interest in or under the registered trademark in ignorance of the licence; and a person claiming to be a licensee by virtue of the licence does not have the protection provided by Section 42 of the Trade Marks Law. Where a person becomes the owner or a licensee of a registered trademark by virtue of a licence, then unless an application for registration of the prescribed particulars of the licence is made before the end of the six-month period beginning on the date of the licence – or the court is satisfied that it was not practicable for such an application to be made before the end of that period and that an application was made as soon as practicable thereafter – that person is not entitled to damages or an account of profits in respect of any infringement of the registered trademark occurring after the date of the transaction and before the prescribed particulars of the licence are registered.

9.3 Can a licensor lose its rights in a trademark by failing to comply with its obligations under the licence, such as maintaining quality control?

There is no provision in the Trade Marks Law for this, but it is prudent for licensors and licensees to abide by the terms of their licence agreements.

10 Protection of foreign trademarks

10.1 Under what circumstances may foreign trademarks not registered in the jurisdiction be enforced (eg, under unfair competition law)?

Where there is use of a foreign trademark in the Cayman Islands that amounts to protectable goodwill, that mark may be protected under the common law of passing off and rights enforceable under the same. However, the foreign trademark registration itself is not protected under the law in the Cayman Islands.

10.2 Does the trademark office permit registration of a mark based on a foreign or international (Madrid) registration?

As of 1 August 2017, the Cayman Islands Intellectual Property Office no longer permits registration of a mark based on a UK or EU trademark or international (Madrid) registration designating the United Kingdom or European Union.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

To print this article, all you need is to be registered on Mondaq.com.

Click to Login as an existing user or Register so you can print this article.

Authors
 
In association with
Practice Guides
by Mondaq Advice Centres
Relevancy Powered by MondaqAI
Related Topics
 
Related Articles
 
Up-coming Events Search
Tools
Print
Font Size:
Translation
Channels
Mondaq on Twitter
 
Mondaq Free Registration
Gain access to Mondaq global archive of over 375,000 articles covering 200 countries with a personalised News Alert and automatic login on this device.
Mondaq News Alert (some suggested topics and region)
Select Topics
Registration (please scroll down to set your data preferences)

Mondaq Ltd requires you to register and provide information that personally identifies you, including your content preferences, for three primary purposes (full details of Mondaq’s use of your personal data can be found in our Privacy and Cookies Notice):

  • To allow you to personalize the Mondaq websites you are visiting to show content ("Content") relevant to your interests.
  • To enable features such as password reminder, news alerts, email a colleague, and linking from Mondaq (and its affiliate sites) to your website.
  • To produce demographic feedback for our content providers ("Contributors") who contribute Content for free for your use.

Mondaq hopes that our registered users will support us in maintaining our free to view business model by consenting to our use of your personal data as described below.

Mondaq has a "free to view" business model. Our services are paid for by Contributors in exchange for Mondaq providing them with access to information about who accesses their content. Once personal data is transferred to our Contributors they become a data controller of this personal data. They use it to measure the response that their articles are receiving, as a form of market research. They may also use it to provide Mondaq users with information about their products and services.

Details of each Contributor to which your personal data will be transferred is clearly stated within the Content that you access. For full details of how this Contributor will use your personal data, you should review the Contributor’s own Privacy Notice.

Please indicate your preference below:

Yes, I am happy to support Mondaq in maintaining its free to view business model by agreeing to allow Mondaq to share my personal data with Contributors whose Content I access
No, I do not want Mondaq to share my personal data with Contributors

Also please let us know whether you are happy to receive communications promoting products and services offered by Mondaq:

Yes, I am happy to received promotional communications from Mondaq
No, please do not send me promotional communications from Mondaq
Terms & Conditions

Mondaq.com (the Website) is owned and managed by Mondaq Ltd (Mondaq). Mondaq grants you a non-exclusive, revocable licence to access the Website and associated services, such as the Mondaq News Alerts (Services), subject to and in consideration of your compliance with the following terms and conditions of use (Terms). Your use of the Website and/or Services constitutes your agreement to the Terms. Mondaq may terminate your use of the Website and Services if you are in breach of these Terms or if Mondaq decides to terminate the licence granted hereunder for any reason whatsoever.

Use of www.mondaq.com

To Use Mondaq.com you must be: eighteen (18) years old or over; legally capable of entering into binding contracts; and not in any way prohibited by the applicable law to enter into these Terms in the jurisdiction which you are currently located.

You may use the Website as an unregistered user, however, you are required to register as a user if you wish to read the full text of the Content or to receive the Services.

You may not modify, publish, transmit, transfer or sell, reproduce, create derivative works from, distribute, perform, link, display, or in any way exploit any of the Content, in whole or in part, except as expressly permitted in these Terms or with the prior written consent of Mondaq. You may not use electronic or other means to extract details or information from the Content. Nor shall you extract information about users or Contributors in order to offer them any services or products.

In your use of the Website and/or Services you shall: comply with all applicable laws, regulations, directives and legislations which apply to your Use of the Website and/or Services in whatever country you are physically located including without limitation any and all consumer law, export control laws and regulations; provide to us true, correct and accurate information and promptly inform us in the event that any information that you have provided to us changes or becomes inaccurate; notify Mondaq immediately of any circumstances where you have reason to believe that any Intellectual Property Rights or any other rights of any third party may have been infringed; co-operate with reasonable security or other checks or requests for information made by Mondaq from time to time; and at all times be fully liable for the breach of any of these Terms by a third party using your login details to access the Website and/or Services

however, you shall not: do anything likely to impair, interfere with or damage or cause harm or distress to any persons, or the network; do anything that will infringe any Intellectual Property Rights or other rights of Mondaq or any third party; or use the Website, Services and/or Content otherwise than in accordance with these Terms; use any trade marks or service marks of Mondaq or the Contributors, or do anything which may be seen to take unfair advantage of the reputation and goodwill of Mondaq or the Contributors, or the Website, Services and/or Content.

Mondaq reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to take any action that it deems necessary and appropriate in the event it considers that there is a breach or threatened breach of the Terms.

Mondaq’s Rights and Obligations

Unless otherwise expressly set out to the contrary, nothing in these Terms shall serve to transfer from Mondaq to you, any Intellectual Property Rights owned by and/or licensed to Mondaq and all rights, title and interest in and to such Intellectual Property Rights will remain exclusively with Mondaq and/or its licensors.

Mondaq shall use its reasonable endeavours to make the Website and Services available to you at all times, but we cannot guarantee an uninterrupted and fault free service.

Mondaq reserves the right to make changes to the services and/or the Website or part thereof, from time to time, and we may add, remove, modify and/or vary any elements of features and functionalities of the Website or the services.

Mondaq also reserves the right from time to time to monitor your Use of the Website and/or services.

Disclaimer

The Content is general information only. It is not intended to constitute legal advice or seek to be the complete and comprehensive statement of the law, nor is it intended to address your specific requirements or provide advice on which reliance should be placed. Mondaq and/or its Contributors and other suppliers make no representations about the suitability of the information contained in the Content for any purpose. All Content provided "as is" without warranty of any kind. Mondaq and/or its Contributors and other suppliers hereby exclude and disclaim all representations, warranties or guarantees with regard to the Content, including all implied warranties and conditions of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, title and non-infringement. To the maximum extent permitted by law, Mondaq expressly excludes all representations, warranties, obligations, and liabilities arising out of or in connection with all Content. In no event shall Mondaq and/or its respective suppliers be liable for any special, indirect or consequential damages or any damages whatsoever resulting from loss of use, data or profits, whether in an action of contract, negligence or other tortious action, arising out of or in connection with the use of the Content or performance of Mondaq’s Services.

General

Mondaq may alter or amend these Terms by amending them on the Website. By continuing to Use the Services and/or the Website after such amendment, you will be deemed to have accepted any amendment to these Terms.

These Terms shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of England and Wales and you irrevocably submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales to settle any dispute which may arise out of or in connection with these Terms. If you live outside the United Kingdom, English law shall apply only to the extent that English law shall not deprive you of any legal protection accorded in accordance with the law of the place where you are habitually resident ("Local Law"). In the event English law deprives you of any legal protection which is accorded to you under Local Law, then these terms shall be governed by Local Law and any dispute or claim arising out of or in connection with these Terms shall be subject to the non-exclusive jurisdiction of the courts where you are habitually resident.

You may print and keep a copy of these Terms, which form the entire agreement between you and Mondaq and supersede any other communications or advertising in respect of the Service and/or the Website.

No delay in exercising or non-exercise by you and/or Mondaq of any of its rights under or in connection with these Terms shall operate as a waiver or release of each of your or Mondaq’s right. Rather, any such waiver or release must be specifically granted in writing signed by the party granting it.

If any part of these Terms is held unenforceable, that part shall be enforced to the maximum extent permissible so as to give effect to the intent of the parties, and the Terms shall continue in full force and effect.

Mondaq shall not incur any liability to you on account of any loss or damage resulting from any delay or failure to perform all or any part of these Terms if such delay or failure is caused, in whole or in part, by events, occurrences, or causes beyond the control of Mondaq. Such events, occurrences or causes will include, without limitation, acts of God, strikes, lockouts, server and network failure, riots, acts of war, earthquakes, fire and explosions.

By clicking Register you state you have read and agree to our Terms and Conditions